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Week 1

Animals including humans

One of the ways in which scientists classify* animals is by sorting them in to two groups. These two groups are vertebrates and invertebrates.

Have a look at the two links below to understand these scientific terms and then there is an activity for you to do.

 

 

 

For this activity, we would like you to look at the picture cards below and sort them into two groups which are, well, vertebrates and invertebrates!

Don't worry if you can't print and cut these out. You can also draw two columns and write the names of the creatures down.

Human Skeletons

Humans are vertebrates, so we have a skeleton. You can probably see some bones on your body. Maybe some of you have broken a bone before. Here is some information about our bones:

 

 

Bones are living, growing tissue that are made of collagen, which provides a soft framework, and a mineral called calcium phosphate, which adds hardness and strength. They also contain blood vessels.

This combination of materials means that bones are hard and strong but also a little bit flexible. This means that if strain is put on them they will flex slightly and not break – so they are actually slightly bendy! However, if they were too bendy they would not be able to carry out their functions well and support our body or protect our organs. Individual bones make up our skeleton, which has joints that enable parts of our bodies, such as our arms and legs, to bend.

Bones are living, growing tissue that are made of collagen, which provides a soft framework, and a mineral called calcium phosphate, which adds hardness and strength. They also contain blood vessels.

This combination of materials means that bones are hard and strong but also a little bit flexible. This means that if strain is put on them they will flex slightly and not break – so they are actually slightly bendy! However, if they were too bendy they would not be able to carry out their functions well and support our body or protect our organs. Individual bones make up our skeleton, which has joints that enable parts of our bodies, such as our arms and legs, to bend.

 

Watch the video below to look at some skeletons in action!

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/clips/zmptsbk

 

Below is an activity to help you to learn some of the names scientists have given our bones.

This will need to be printed and you will also need colouring pencils. Parents. keep the answers hidden!
Further learning: Can you find out the names of any other bones? Where are the smallest bones in the body?
* can you find out what this word means?
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